Jade's Little Tumble

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Roderick’s Rendezvous, 4th Meeting.



“I can’t keep predicating utopia on the mass slaughter of baby boomers.”*

“Shooting stars x Deer = Profundity.”

So, Badgers are rechristened “Eager Beavers.” I’d show you the patch but I couldn’t afford it this week, hopefully I can get one next week (if I can even get into the show next week**). If I somehow make it to Raven level, I may try to cosplay, but I don’t know if I have the right hat. ANYWHO…

Roderick talked a bit about having recently attended the Conference on World Affairs. P.S. Check out the panels he was on!

The second half of the show was the absolute most hilarious banter between Roderick and special guest - John Hodgman! YAY! I could do nothing else but watch the two of them go for the rest of my life. Such compatible sass I can barely stand it! The Rendezvous also has two less bourbon glasses as a result of this show.

The gentlemen’s version of a bedtime story involved bombs and sword canes.

There was a little Q&A, but it just opened those two up for more amazing nonsense. Also, it revealed that maybe a stab-proof vest is maybe not the worst thing to pack in your small bag.

In conclusion, I took a lot of notes. I expect this show will pull at least one more fanart out of me.

**I am slightly annoyed by the crowd, because people keep buying up tickets, preventing other people who have been attending from getting their tickets for the following week. I do get it, the show is awesome, the guests are awesome, and probably a lot of us have been wanting to see this exact thing forever, so you wanna go, you want your friends to go, you want everyone to see it. Yay. But… every show he asks who is new and “How does this happen? This isn’t supposed to be happening.”

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Wwhheeeeeeeeeee!

Wwhheeeeeeeeeee!

(Source: retrowar)

"Look, when I said get off your high horse, you didn’t need to overreact."

"Look, when I said get off your high horse, you didn’t need to overreact."

(Source: jajaneenee)

tastefullyoffensive:

Goat GIFs [x]

Previously: Animals Stealing Food



I have no idea what you mean, Thera.
(via Body Shapes : A Handy Guide — I Love Charts — Medium)

(via Body Shapes : A Handy Guide — I Love Charts — Medium)

(via International Landlubber Code Flags — The Nib  — Medium)

(via International Landlubber Code Flags — The Nib  — Medium)

Rendezvous, 3rd show.

As I am getting ready for the 4th show, and feeling bad for not having come up with anything in particular to show…

Anyway, Blood Moon + Badger levels members (people who have thus far made it to all the shows) = art!

I don’t know what to say about last week’s show. The first part was largely about Roderick’s father death, and it feels like tales best heard from him. It was followed by tales of crime and woodsy hijinks with Mike Squires, former Long Winter, dater of former Roderick dates. So why aren’t you at these shows, again?

Of relevant note to a previous/current topic regarding the Roderick family history in Seattle, this may be of some interest.

Rendezvous, 3rd show.

As I am getting ready for the 4th show, and feeling bad for not having come up with anything in particular to show…

Anyway, Blood Moon + Badger levels members (people who have thus far made it to all the shows) = art!

I don’t know what to say about last week’s show. The first part was largely about Roderick’s father death, and it feels like tales best heard from him. It was followed by tales of crime and woodsy hijinks with Mike Squires, former Long Winter, dater of former Roderick dates. So why aren’t you at these shows, again?

Of relevant note to a previous/current topic regarding the Roderick family history in Seattle, this may be of some interest.

Star Lines by bluefooted

saxifraga-x-urbium:

illustratedjai:

scifigrl47:

geardrops:

fastcompany:

Portable Robot Printer Is Like A Roomba That Squirts Ink

it’s so cute i want an army of them

OH MY GOD IT’S LIKE A MAGIC WRITING BOX I WANT IT.

Me: “Can I have one?” 
F & A: (Simultaneously) “Yes.”
Me: “Can I put googly eyes on it?”
F & A: (Simultaneously) “Yes!”
Me: “Can I give it a little mohawk out of paper?” 
F & A: (Simultaneously) “YES!”

oooo




I don’t know why it took my brain this long to get there, but first I thought “Crafting!” and eventually - digitally altering clothing patterns to the size/scale needed, laying out fabric, and letting this print right on the fabric. That’d be a neat idea, anyway.

saxifraga-x-urbium:

illustratedjai:

scifigrl47:

geardrops:

fastcompany:

Portable Robot Printer Is Like A Roomba That Squirts Ink

it’s so cute i want an army of them

OH MY GOD IT’S LIKE A MAGIC WRITING BOX I WANT IT.

Me: “Can I have one?” 

F & A: (Simultaneously) “Yes.”

Me: “Can I put googly eyes on it?”

F & A: (Simultaneously) “Yes!”

Me: “Can I give it a little mohawk out of paper?” 

F & A: (Simultaneously) “YES!”

oooo



I don’t know why it took my brain this long to get there, but first I thought “Crafting!” and eventually - digitally altering clothing patterns to the size/scale needed, laying out fabric, and letting this print right on the fabric. That’d be a neat idea, anyway.

So, you’ve decided to talk to an artist

phantom42:

I don’t consider myself an artist, but most of my friends are, and I’m married to one. Over the years, I’ve seen a lot of behavior that ranges from awkward to outright unacceptable. Here are some dos and don’ts to ensure that your experience with an artist is a good one for both parties. This is based on things I’ve seen myself, and from stories told to me by artists.
Don’t tell an artist, “SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY!" or "I would totally buy that!" if you’re not ready and/or willing to back it up with an actual purchase. Artists love that you love the piece, but often produce pieces/quantities based on apparent interest and potential customers. Gauges of potential buyers and gauges of general interest are both very important, but they are very different.
Do tell an artist that you love the piece. Just be honest about it. It’s OK if it’s out of your price range. It’s OK if you have no practical use or place for a piece. Most artists get the warm fuzzies just from honest compliments even if you’re not going to be a paying customer.
Don’t assume that every message to an artist is going to get a response. Most artists read every message they get, but don’t always have time to respond to everything.

Do give the artist some time to respond. Some artists get a lot of messages and have to balance their time responding with their workload and still make time to be a person and have a life outside of art.

Don’t comment on a piece telling the artist how much it reminds you of some other artist’s work or other character (unless you’re calling them out on a blatant copyright violation). In your mind, you may see it as a compliment. You loved the art style in some movie, and this seems similar to you - you’re complimenting this artist, right?! The artist may have been influenced by that same work, but most are consciously aiming to evolve from that influence. Just as it’s dangerous to tell someone that you notice that they look good after losing some weight (“What, I didn’t look good before?!” or “No, I haven’t. Do I normally look fat?!”), not everyone sees this as a compliment.

Do be specific about compliments. “I really like the pose” or “This really captures the movement well.”
Don’t tell an artist what they should do next. “This is awesome! You should do this other character next!” The only people artists need to take instructions from are themselves and paying customers. 
Do politely tell the artist what subjects you might like to see. There’s a big difference in tone between, “Do my favorite character next!” and “I would love to see more art along these lines, possibly of this character.”
Don’t tell artists how to use their tools or materials better. You don’t know what they’ve tried or what they do. They may have tried it and it didn’t work. Lots of ideas sound good in our heads or on paper, and don’t work out as well in reality.
Do ask artists how they use their tools or materials. Ask if they’ve tried it your way. Offer informed insight. This boils down to attitude and tone. Bad: “Do this instead.” Good: After a conversation leading to it, “have you tried doing this instead?”
Don’t assume or expect artists to share their tricks, techniques, sources of materials or services with you. Some are open; some are guarded. There is no right, and no wrong. They don’t owe you anything. Most sources of materials or services are near the top of the page if you do a simple web search.
Do be gracious and actually respond if they answer your question about tricks, techniques, sources, or services. If they took the time to answer your question about something, a minimum of “Thank you.” is in order
Don’t ask for freebies, or free/spec work. For many artists, art isn’t a hobby - it’s their living. They don’t have time to make you free art. We’re all very sure that your new game/book/comic/restaurant/store really is going to be the next big thing. Part of building a business the right way is properly valuing your talent and assets - that includes the artists you hire - “hire” being the operative word. Exposure is great. Food on the table is even better.
Do contact artists with well thought out opportunities that acknowledge and value their time, skill, and effort. Just understand that they may not be as passionate about your project as you are. 
Don’t be a creeper or be inappropriate. Just because you’ve gotten a response to an email or comment, or because you’ve purchased something from an artist, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re BFF’s now. Being friendly is not the same as being friends. Until you’re friends, a general rule would be to not say anything that would be inappropriate to say to any random person on the street.
Do be conscious of boundaries. Be polite, complete your transactions or interactions, and move along. 
Don’t come across like a five year-old (unless you are one). No one is expecting your message to read like a Pulitzer winning story, but thoughts should be mature and cohesive. Proper grammar and punctuation go a long way.
Do proofread your messages before you hit post/send. If you’re dealing with an artist in person, pause for a moment and think about what you’re about to say - and don’t ever be a creeper or inappropriate.
Don’t ask if you can ask a question. This tip is brought you by the Department of Redundancy Department.
Do check the artist’s FAQ and relevant descriptions if applicable. If your question has not already been answered, just ask it. 
Don’t automatically assume that the artist knows as much about your favorite fandom as you do. Artists often know just enough about a subject to complete a piece. 
Do express your love for your favorite character or fandom, just remember that you may be the only one who shares the love.
Don’t ask why a piece of art “costs that much”. A piece of art is not the end product of just the time and materials to create a piece. It is a result and sum total of the artist’s career as an artist as they learn and hone their skills,  as well as the materials and time spent creating that particular piece.
Do ask how much an available piece costs (assuming that the price isn’t already listed. You looked right?)
Don’t tell an artist you “wish [you] could afford this.” Most artists see this as a passive-aggressive complaint about their prices, which are usually underpriced to begin with. If you can’t afford a piece, that’s on you, not the artist. 
Do begin saving up for a piece if you’re honestly interested in it, or contact the artist about getting a custom piece done in the future.
Don’t ask how much another customer paid for a custom piece of art.  The price charged to the previous customer was the agreed upon price at the time. It is possible, and even likely, that the price will be different. Artists learn something new with almost every piece they do. What took 10 hours the first time may only take 8 hours the next. But an artist’s hourly rate may have gone up. Prices of materials may have changed. The cost to produce a piece varies constantly. Plus, it’s just a little gauche.
Do ask if prints are available (after checking the description, of course).

kellysue:

I cry because being over 40 and not having a paying job right now is like being an economic stroke patient. Every minute counts, or you’re looking at a longer recovery, more obstacles along the way, more work to persuade everyone that you don’t need their pity so much as you need them to shut up and assume you’ll ask for it if you want it.

- The Stroke, The Fire by Janice Barlow Collier (aka ardaniel)

By my friend Janice. 

(Source: yearbookoffice)

Whitewashing Defenders' Greatest Hits

reverseracism:

reverseracism:

reverseracism:

reverseracism:

"If you have to have someone who looks like you in the media in order for you to relate then maybe you’re the one who’s racist"

"children don’t see/care about race"

image

image

image

"Color doesn’t…

I will never understand people who are mean for no reason, mean for laughs, mean for sport. Life is hard enough without gratuitous cruelty.

- Twitter / 52stations: I will never understand people …

Thank you, your quest for black people in medieval Bohemia just made my day. Did you know, that we also imported Inuits and penguins? We used them in our medieval theme parks. Because you wouldn´t want to have your accuracy clouded by facts ;) Thanks again.

medievalpoc:

This was never particularly funny or fun, but this is actually a new low. Apparently, the inclusion of people of color in a video game is as laughable and ridiculous to you as putting penguins in the game. Like, on top of the comparison to animals (how original), there’s the whole implication that including specifically Black people is so inherently something that “doesn’t belong”, it stands on its own as your idea of a joke.

Like, let’s really be honest here. It’s been months since someone originally asked me a question about Kingdom Come: Deliverance and its lack of any representation of people of color whatsoever (not to mention any female player character, and then claiming to have the most “ultimate character customization tool ever created”).

And on top of the obvious fact that they made the game, just as they intended it originally, the fandom for this game at this point just comes off like a cross between sore winners and gloating bullies. All I did was point out on my blog that they could have put people of color in their video game (and that includes Asian people, Romani/Roma people, Black people, seriously, everyone has historical precedent), but they didn’t want to, and so they didn’t.

But it still needs to be rubbed in. Because apparently I and anyone and everyone else who MIGHT have been interested in the game and is a person of color need to be put in their place. The harassing messages weren’t enough, the endless threads about how I was “attacking” these poor, blameless millionaire game developers weren’t enough, the message board traffic from the Czech republic using racial slurs (in English) and talking about “doing a hate crime” that made me late for work one day so I could deal with that….it’s never really enough, is it?

Because how dare I say anything, ever. How dare any person of color want to be a part of something that was apparently intended not just for white men only, but the kind of person who sends this kind of message.

Because it’s not enough to win. You have to really rub their faces in the dirt, shame them, make them sorry they EVER said ANYTHING, even looked in your direction. Because even MONTHS LATER, you have to come back and revisit it, shove them around some more. Tell them they’re animals, they’re a joke, they are pathetic and ridiculous to try and make sure they never speak again, never criticize, never challenge.

I appreciate the messages people have sent me expressing concern for my safety, but I’m an activist in my day to day life, too. I run these risks knowingly, and because this is too important to stop. I work with other activists, including ones who used to do even more dangerous work previously, and honestly, why the hell should we live our lives in fear?

I hope it makes people sick to their stomachs to think that we would be considered at risk for helping people. It’s my job to facilitate, accommodate, counsel, and advocate for marginalized students. But it just wasn’t enough, and I started this blog because some people can’t even make it to college at all. I believe everyone should have access to this knowledge, not just those who can pay.

The real point here is that I want my readers to know that this jackass can chuckle all they want, I am not going to stop. I won’t shut up, and for every chucklehead like this, there’s someone like me who’s fighting.

muhbones:

'then write one' is such a fucking shitty response to the desire for more representation in media

guess what? i write shit that i want to see in media all of the goddamn time

and eight thousand fucking notes on my post is proof i am not alone in this desire

people create these things all of the time

but they are kept quiet, their voices are taken and modified for the status quo

don’t ask us ‘to write one’

ask about what happened after we did and why you’ve never heard of it

(Source: asealuponyourarm)